Antibiotics

The term antibiotics was first used in 1942 by Selman Waksman and his collaborator

The term antibiotic was first used in 1942 by Selman Waksman and his collaborators in journal articles to describe any substance produced by a microorganism that is antagonistic to the growth of other microorganisms in high dilution.This definition excluded substances that kill bacteria, but are not produced by microorganisms (such as gastric juices and hydrogen peroxide).

It also excluded synthetic antibacterial compounds such as the sulfonamides.

The Greek word anti means "against", and the Greek word bios means "life" (bacteria are life forms).

Most of today's antibiotics are semisynthetic modifications of various natural compounds.

Report: Antibiotics Partnering Terms and Agreements

The term antibiotics was first used in 1942 by Selman Waksman and his collaborators in journal articles to describe any substance produced by a microorganism that is antagonistic to the growth of other microorganisms in high dilution.

This definition excluded substances that kill bacteria, but are not produced by microorganisms (such as gastric juices and hydrogen peroxide).

It also excluded synthetic antibacterial compounds such as the sulfonamides.

The Greek word anti means "against", and the Greek word bios means "life" (bacteria are life forms).

Most of today's antibiotics are semisynthetic modifications of various natural compounds.

Antibiotic partnering

The last two years alone (2011-12) has seen $1.5 billion spent on antibiotics partnering by the biopharma industry.

Antibiotics partnering has been steady with 2013 (to April) already seeing 10 deals by small and bigpharma companies.

Not all bigpharma and bigbiotech companies are actively involved in antibiotics partnering, however companies such as GlaxoSmithKline with 10 deals signed since 2007, are particularly active in this area.

Report: Antibiotics Partnering Terms and Agreements

Example deals available in our Antibiotics partnering analysis in biopharma industry article.

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